Blueberry Scones Of Delightful Flavor!



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Here's recipes to make your Tea Time special with any of these blueberry scones! Add a splash of clotted cream topping, to make them Supreme!

Scones are perfect for the afternoon tea time break, to savor with a cup of – tea – of course!

Where did scones come from?

They started out as a Scottish quickly made bread. They were once initially made with oats and griddle-baked over a fire.

However, today’s scones are generally made with flour and baked in the oven.

In the 1800's, scones became an essential part of the English tradition called the “Afternoon Tea Time” that is at 4:00 pm. In Britain, they are still served daily with the traditional clotted cream topping, which has the consistency of butter, but tastes like whipped cream!

Once you get passed being freaked out by the term "Clotted Cream" - like I was - you'll discover an excellent topping for these scones! It compliments these tasty blueberries!

If you can't find a place to buy clotted cream (sometimes they call it Devonshire cream), here are instructions to make your own:

clotted cream


Clotted Cream Instructions:

You need fresh full cream milk, straight from the cow. Pour it into a shallow pan, and leave it to stand for about 12 hours for the cream to rise to the surface. (If you don't have a cow, just use fresh cream. Heat it until it bubbles.)

Then you heat the milk extremely slowly, until the surface begins to wrinkle: on no account allow the milk to boil. The slower the heating is done, the better the result. About an hour of moderate heating is what's needed. Transfer the pan to a cool place and leave overnight.

In the morning the clotted cream can be spooned off the surface. If you cannot get milk that's creamy enough, you can try adding extra runny cream to the milk to improve its cream content.


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